Develop By Example – Document Store Connections using Node.js

In this post we are going to explain how to connect a Node.js application to a MySQL server using the new MySQL Connector/Node.js; needless to say that we will be using the MySQL server as a document store.

There are two types of session that a connection can provide: XSession and NodeSession.
An XSession encapsulates access to a single MySQL server running the X Plugin or
multiple MySQL Cluster nodes; and the NodeSession serves as an abstraction for a physical connection to exactly one MySQL server running the X Plugin. To enable the XPlugin in the MySQL server using the MySQL Client command line you need to use the root account or an account with INSERT privilege to mysql.plugin table:

  • Invoke the MySQL command-line client: mysql -u user –p
  • Run the following command: INSTALL PLUGIN mysqlx SONAME ‘mysqlx.so’;

Click here for more information about how to setting up MySQL as document store.

Creating a connection to a MySQL server as a document store is quite similar to create a connection to a traditional MySQL server; we require the following connection parameters: host, database user, user password, and port.

The following example demonstrates how to connect to a single MySQL Server using XSession:

In the previous code example, we created and closed a connection to a server using an XSession; as you can see the code is very simple and easy to read.

The first line of code loads the Connector/Node.js client module, mysqlx. We then call its getSession method. This method implements a promise. If the connection to the MySQL server is successful the promise is fulfilled by returning an XSession (session) object. We then call the session object’s close method to close the connection.

In the previous code there are two important things to note. The first one is that we do not specify a schema because the XSession works similar to a traditional session: You do not need to specify a schema because, at the time you connect, your working schema might not exist yet. The second one is the port. By default the X DevAPI uses the port 33060; we are assuming that the running server is using the default port for TCP/IP connections. The port can be configured when the server starts and is stored in a server variable.

The following example demonstrates how to connect to a single MySQL Server using NodeSession:

The NodeSession example code is almost the same code used to get an XSession object, the difference is the method that is called to get the session object and the port; the code does exactly the same.

You might need to use a NodeSession in certain scenarios where you require access to SQL features that are not supported by an XSession. In a subsequent post we are going to cover some examples about how to use the NodeSession.

To work with schemas and collections we need to add some extra lines of code. The following code demonstrates how to do it.

In the last code example; from the session object, we call the getSchema method to get an object (schema) that represents the schema in which we want to work. Once we have the schema object we execute the method getCollection to get an object (coll) that represents the collection we want to work with. In this example, we want to retrieve the document with an id value of ‘1’ from the collection. First we call the find method passing the JSON path and value we are searching for. Then we call the execute method to perform the query. The execute method returns a promise which supplies the requested document when the method completes.

See you in the next blog post where we are going to explain more about the operations that can be performed using collections.

Develop By Example – New MySQL Document Store Series

Examples are a great way to learn new things. As many of you may or may not know we’ve added some new things to MySQL Server 5.7.12  and the ecosystem around it, extending it  to allow you to use the MySQL as a Document Store. Meeting the challenge meant expanding Developer Interfaces and Database tools.

  • Addressing information with a both classic and modern data architectures
  • For all types of data – structured, semi, and unstructured
  • Empowering developers – Simpler, Faster, Flexible
  • Leveraging latest NoSQL oriented tools/methods – JavaScript, Node.js, JSON, CRUD, Methods chaining, and more

From the developer side the MySQL Document Store new APIs by introducing a JSON/Document Store oriented called the MySQL X DevAPI. This programming API provides the option for accessing MySQL; and its design unifies JSON document and table access; and it includes SQL support as well. Since the API features a popular fluent interface style, you will be able to use a NoSQL-like syntax to execute Create, Read, Update, Delete (CRUD) operations against these documents.

This new API is provided to developers in our latest MySQL Connectors. As again as learning by example is often the best way to get started with new things we’re also providing an example application we’re calling Movie Review to show you how it’s used in real applications with use cases that likely map to how you’d want to develop.

As there are a range of languages supported by the MySQL Connectors and Drivers – New Connector/Node.js as well as connectors for Java, Python, .NET, C, C++, and PHP – we plan to do Movie Review examples applications across the various languages.
Were calling our new example application – Movie Review – and as you might have guessed it revolves around developing web applications that allows users to review movies via a simple application that demonstrates the usage of the new features available in the X Dev API and connectors.

We will have 2 user types within the application – users and administrators.

The users can:

  • Search for a movie to view its description and any existing reviews
  • Review a movie
  • Update or delete a review they have written

The administrators can:

  • See the movies to view its description and any existing reviews
  • Upload new information to the database manually or from a JSON file
  • View the current data in the collections to edit it or delete it
  • View some simple reports.

With these use cases we hope to quickly and simply take you through the key development concepts quickly using CRUD type programming.

The Document Store Data Model

Since the application will be kept simple, we’re also including simple document store database you can easy load. It includes four collections: Actors, Movies, Reviews, and Users. It comes with the entire example data loaded that you’ll need as well. This will help to teach you some of the basics of document store style modeling.

We’ll provide the steps to install, etc in the example blogs and have you up and running and developing with MySQL Document Store in no time.

See you in the next blog post – where we get into the Movie Review application written with Node.js.

MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0.3 has been released

The MySQL Windows Experience Team is proud to announce the release of MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0.3 m2. Note that this is a development preview release and not intended for production usage.

MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0.3 M2 is the second development preview release of the MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0 series.  This series adds support for the new X DevAPI. The X DevAPI enables application developers to write code that combines the strengths of the relational and document models using a modern, NoSQL-like syntax that does not assume previous experience writing traditional SQL.

To learn more about how to write applications using the X DevAPI, see http://dev.mysql.com/doc/x-devapi-userguide/en/. For more information about how the X DevAPI is implemented in MySQL for Visual Studio, and its usage, see http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/mysql-shell-visual-studio.html.

Please note that the X DevAPI requires at least MySQL Server version 5.7.12 or higher with the X Plugin enabled. For general documentation about how to get started using MySQL as a document store, see http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/document-store.html.

You can download MySQL Installer from our official Downloads page at http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/installer/.

MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0.3 m2 can also be downloaded by using the product standalone installer found at http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/windows/visualstudio/, under the tab “Development Releases”.

Changes in MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0.3 m2

Bugs Fixed

  • The “mysqlx” module was not imported properly to execute JavaScript queries.  (Bug #23091964, Bug #81052)
  • After opening a valid MySQL connection and creating a new JavaScript MySQL script, disconnecting then reconnecting to the MySQL Server while changing the port to 33060 would fail.
  • MySQL for Visual Studio now shows a message stating that a SSL connection is required by the MySQL server if the require_secure_transport variable is set.
  • All script editors now display detailed information about the connection used. Before, the information was displayed in the toolbar as labels, but now all information is consolidated in a menu opened where the connection name is displayed. Additional information includes the connection method, host identifier, server version, user, and schema.
  • Output from executing JavaScript and Python commands were not visible unless the Output window was already opened.  The Output window now automatically opens when executing commands.

What’s new in 2.0.3 m2

  • Improved the handling of errors, warnings and execution stats output of X DevAPI statements. All messages are properly handled and displayed after batch or console execution.
  • Added SSL support for MySQL connections that use the X Protocol. SSL support works with PEM files, so SSL connections need to be created through the “MySQL Connections Manager” in MySQL for Visual Studio, or from MySQL Workbench.
  • Added support for the following X DevAPI functions:
    parseUri() and isOpen().
  • A new “MySQL Output” pane was added that contains a results grid view similar to the view found in MySQL Workbench. It contains the following data for executed statements: Success, Execution index, Execution Time, Query Text, Message (output from the server), and Duration / Fetch. This functionality is available for JavaScript and Python queries.
  • Added “Console Mode” support for JavaScript and Python script editors, where query execution mimics the way the MySQL Shell works, meaning X DevAPI statements are executed after hitting “ENTER” and results are displayed inline.
  • Added the ability to switch between “Batch” (execute multiple statements) and “Console” (execute each statement after pressing Enter) modes, from the Query Editor toolbar as a dropdown list.
  • A MySQL connection manager dialog was added to help fully manage MySQL connections. It supports connection sharing with MySQL Workbench, and supports create, edit, configure, and delete actions.  MySQL connections created with the connection manager where the password is securely stored in the system’s password vault functions with the Server Explorer in Visual Studio. The password is extracted from the password vault, and persists in the Server Explorer connections.

Known limitations

  • Some features such as Entity Framework and some Server Explorer functionality like drag & drop elements into a Dataset Designer or Design Tables do not work in this version.

Quick links

Enjoy and thanks for the support!

MySQL for Visual Studio Team.

MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0.2 has been released

The MySQL Windows Experience Team is proud to announce the release of MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0.2 m1. Note that this is a milestone release and not intended for production usage.

MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0.2 m1 is the first development release of MySQL for Visual Studio to add support for the new X DevAPI. The X DevAPI enables application developers to write code that combines the strengths of the relational and document models using a modern, NoSQL-like syntax that does not assume previous experience writing traditional SQL.

For more information about how the X DevAPI is implemented in MySQL for Visual Studio, and its usage, please refer to the MySQL for Visual Studio Quick-Start Guide.

Please also note that the X DevAPI requires at least MySQL Server version 5.7.12 or higher with the X Plugin enabled. For general documentation about how to get started using MySQL as a document database, see Using MySQL as a Document Store.

You can download MySQL for Visual Studio 2.0.2 m1 at this link http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/windows/visualstudio/, under the tab “Development Releases”.

What’s new in 2.0.2 m1

  • Added support for the new X DevAPI.
  • Updated the MySQL parser’s grammar to include keywords introduced in MySQL 5.7.
  • Minor optimizations to script editor window.

Known limitations

  • SSL connections are not yet supported.

Quick links

Enjoy and thanks for the support!

MySQL for Visual Studio Team.

Announcing MySQL Connector/J 6.0

We are pleased to announce the first release of MySQL Connector/J 6.0! This is a new branch of development, which breaks from some of the traditions of the very stable and very mature Connector/J 5.1 branch. We have combed through lots of code and refactored it in order to support development of future features including our X DevAPI implementation and support for X Protocol. This work manifests in a number of visible changes, including revising the growing set of connection and build properties.

Beginning with Connector/J 6.0, we are moving away from having one jar that supports all versions of Java. Instead we are building one jar/package for every supported version of Java. This simplifies the build process as well as lots of code that was required to support many versions of Java. The current package is built for Java 8.

Note that Connector/J 6.0.2 is a milestone release and not intended for production usage.

All changes are documented in the MySQL Connector/J 6.0 Developer Guide.

Updates to connection properties, including removal of several options that are no longer needed with the latest versions of MySQL and Java. Additionally, we removed some legacy behavioral options. You can see the changes in the documentation:
Connector/J 6.0 Changes in Connection Properties

If you are building from source or running the test suite, check the following:
Connector/J 6.0 Changes for Build Properties
Connector/J 6.0 Changes for Test Properties

Finally, API changes and package reorganizations are documented at:
Changes in the Connector/J API

Release notes are available at Changes in MySQL Connector/J 6.0.2 (2016-04-11, Milestone 1).

MySQL for Visual Studio – Uninstall workaround

In MySQL for Visual Studio version 1.2.4 and earlier, there was an issue, existing only under a specific scenario, which was preventing the plugin to be uninstalled (either using the “Remove” option in the Windows Control Panel/Programs, or the MySQL Installer for Windows) or upgraded to a newer version, causing the uninstall/update action to be rolled back during the process. (For further information about this issue please refer to http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=71226).

Such scenario can be achieved as follows:

  1. First install Visual Studio 2012, or VS 2013 or VS 2015
  2. Then, install MySQL for Visual Studio version 1.2.4 or earlier
  3. Later, uninstall Visual Studio 2012, or VS2013 or VS2015

With the scenario described above, the uninstall/upgrade process of the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin is aborted, leaving it installed on the computer.

It is important to mention that this issue was already fixed in MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2.5 or later, so we encourage you to download and install the latest version available. You can choose to upgrade via the MySQL Installer for Windows, or running the MySQL for Visual Studio standalone installer that you can download here: http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/windows/visualstudio.

Anyway, if you only want to uninstall the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin, and have the scenario described above, you can follow the next steps:

1. Manually create the missing registry values and files needed for the uninstall process of the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin:

a) Create (if not exists) the following registry hive:

* If you had VS 2012 when the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin was installed:

– For 32-bit OS:

HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\VisualStudio\11.0\Setup\VS

Having the key “EnvironmentDirectory” with the value “C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\

– For 64-bit OS:

HKLM:\Software\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\VisualStudio\11.0\Setup\VS

Having the key “EnvironmentDirectory” with the value “C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\

vsRegistryPath_VS2012

(Figure 1: Registry key needed for Visual Studio 2012)

* If you had VS 2013 when the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin was installed:

– For 32-bit OS:

HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\VisualStudio\12.0

Having the key “ShellFolder” with the value “C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\

– For 64-bit OS

HKLM:\Software\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\VisualStudio\12.0

Having the key “ShellFolder” with the value “C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\

vsRegistryPath_VS2013

(Figure 2: Registry key needed for Visual Studio 2013)

* If you had VS 2015 when the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin was installed:

– For 32-bit OS:

HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\VisualStudio\14.0

Having the key “ShellFolder” with the value “C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\

– For 64-bit OS

HKLM:\Software\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\VisualStudio\14.0

Having the key “ShellFolder” with the value “C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\

vsRegistryPath_VS2015

(Figure 3: Registry key needed for Visual Studio 2015)

b) Create (if not exists) an empty file named “extensions.configurationchanged“, in the following path:

* If you had VS 2012 when the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin was installed:

– For 32-bit OS:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\Extensions\

– For 64-bit OS

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\Extensions\

extensionsFilePath_VS2012

(Figure 4: File needed for Visual Studio 2012)

* If you had VS 2013 when the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin was installed:

– For 32-bit OS:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\Common7\IDE\Extensions\

– For 64-bit OS

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\Common7\IDE\Extensions\

extensionsFilePath_VS2013

(Figure 5: File needed for Visual Studio 2013)

* If you had VS 2015 when the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin was installed:

– For 32-bit OS:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Common7\IDE\Extensions\

– For 64-bit OS

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Common7\IDE\Extensions\

extensionsFilePath_VS2015

(Figure 6: File needed for Visual Studio 2015)

c) Proceed to uninstall the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin, using the “Remove” option in the Windows Control Panel/Programs, or executing the plugin installer (version 1.2.4 or earlier).

2. Create and execute two PowerShell scripts to automate the process mentioned in step 1, performing the next operations:

a) Using a text editor, create a new text file

b) Copy the following script into the file:

Note: This script is provided as a convenience to you as-is, without any express or implied warranties of any kind. Its intention is to automate the process of create the registry values and files needed by the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin uninstall process.  Oracle is not liable for any issues arising out of your use of the script.

c) Save the file as “M4VSUninstall_Validation.ps1”. Verify the file extension is “.ps1” (selecting the option “All Files” from the drop-down list in the “Save as type” option), so the same is not saved as text, but as a valid PowerShell file. Save it to a valid path, like “C:\Temp”.

d) Following the same steps explained above, create a second “.ps1” file, with the following script:

Note: This script is provided as a convenience to you as-is, without any express or implied warranties of any kind. Its intention is to automate the cleanup operations once the registry values and files needed by the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin uninstall process has been created.  Oracle is not liable for any issues arising out of your use of the script.

Save the file as “M4VSUninstall_PostValidation.ps1” in the same path, validating it is saved as a PowerShell file.

e) Open a PowerShell command window, and go to the path where you saved the scripts (like “C:\Temp”)

f) Execute the following command:

g) Uninstall the MySQL for Visual Studio plugin.

h) Execute the following command:

in order to cleanup any registry/files created by the scripts, and needed by the uninstall process.

With this workaround, you should be able to uninstall MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2.4 and earlier.

Thank you all for your support, and keep enjoying MySQL for Visual Studio.

MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2.6 has been released

The MySQL Windows Experience Team is proud to announce the release of MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2.6. This is a maintenance release for 1.2.x. It can be used for production environments.

MySQL for Visual Studio is a product that includes all of the Visual Studio integration functionality to create and manage MySQL databases when developing .NET applications.

MySQL for Visual Studio is installed using the MySQL Installer for Windows which comes in 2 versions:

  • Full (150 MB) which includes a complete set of MySQL products with their binaries included in the downloaded bundle.
  • Web (1.5 MB – a network install) which will just pull MySQL for Visual Studio over the web and install it when run.

You can download MySQL Installer from our official Downloads page at http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/installer/.

MySQL for Visual Studio can also be downloaded by using the product standalone installer found at http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/windows/visualstudio/.

 

Changes in MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2.6 (2016-01-07)

Bugs Fixed

  • With MySQL for Visual Studio installed, attempting to create MSSQL connections would fail and throw an exception.
  • The Tools, Extensions and Updates, Installed, Tools window always reported “1.0.0” as the current MySQL for Visual Studio version number.
  • Executing Generate Database from Model from an existing Entity Framework model would throw an exception related to an error with the T4 template file, when then aborted the creation of the database. The Connector/Net Entity Framework assembly (MySql.Data.Entity.EF6.dll) path was fixed in the MySQL T4 template file (SSDLToMySQL.tt).
  • With Visual Studio 2012, generating a database from a model would fail and throw an exception. However, clicking OK after the error would cause the action to succeed.

 

What Is New In MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2

  • New MySQL Project Items for creating data views in Windows Forms and ASP.NET MVC web applications.
  • A new option in web configuration tool for the ASP.NET Personalization Provider (this feature requires MySQL Connector/NET 6.9 or newer).
  • A new option in web configuration tool for the ASP.NET Site Map Provider (this feature requires MySQL Connector/NET 6.9 or newer).
  • A new option for the MySQLSimpleMembership provider in the web configuration tool. (This feature requires MySQL Connector/NET or newer).

 

MySQL Windows Forms Project Item


This Project Item is available on the Add New Item dialog in Visual Studio when adding a new item to an existing project.

The dialog presented to create the MySQL Windows Forms Project Item automates the generation of a Windows Form, representing a view for MySQL data available through an existing Entity Framework’s model entity containing a MySQL table or view. Different view types are available to present the data:

  • Single-column: A form that contains one control by each existing column in the table with navigation controls and that allows CRUD operations.All controls can include validations for numeric and DateTime data types.
  • Grid: A form with a data grid view that contains navigation controls.
  • Master-detail: A form with a single control layout for the Parent table and a data grid view to navigate through child table’s data.

Supported with C# or Visual Basic language. This feature requires Connector/NET 6.7.5, 6.8.3 or 6.9.x.

For more details on the features included check the documentation at: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-net/en/visual-studio-project-items-forms.html

 

MySQL ASP.NET MVC Project Item


This Project Item is available on the Add New Item dialog in Visual Studio when adding a new item to an existing project.

The dialog presented to create the MySQL ASP.NET MVC Item automates the generation of a controller and its corresponding view, representing a view for MySQL data available through an existing Entity Framework’s model entity containing a MySQL table or view. The MVC versions supported by this wizard are 3 when using Visual Studio 2010 or 2012, and 4 when using Visual Studio 2013 or greater.

The generation of the MVC items is done by creating an Entity Framework data model either with Entity Framework version 5 or 6 depending on the user’s selection.

Supported with C# or Visual Basic language. This feature requires Connector/NET 6.7.5, 6.8.3 or 6.9.x.

For more details on the features included check the documentation at: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-net/en/visual-studio-project-items-mvc.html

 

New option in web configuration tool for the ASP.NET Personalization Provider


Personalization provider allows to store personalization state-state data regarding the content and layout of Web Parts pages-generated by the Web Parts personalization service using MySQL as a data source. This feature requires Connector/NET 6.9.x or greater.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-net/en/connector-net-website-config.html

 

New option in web configuration tool for the ASP.NET Site Map Provider


Site Map provider allows to show a hierarchical list of links that describe the structure of a site. This feature requires Connector/NET 6.9.x or greater.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-net/en/connector-net-website-config.html

 

New option in web configuration tool for the ASP.NET Simple Membership provider


The latest provider added to handle web site membership tasks with ASP.NET. This feature requires Connector/Net 6.9.x or greater.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-net/en/connector-net-simple-membership-tutorial.html

 

Quick links:

Enjoy and thanks for the support!

MySQL for Excel 1.3.5 has been released

The MySQL Windows Experience Team is proud to announce the release of MySQL for Excel version 1.3.5. This is a maintenance release for 1.3.x. It can be used for production environments.

MySQL for Excel is an application add-in enabling data analysts to very easily access and manipulate MySQL data within Microsoft Excel. It enables you to directly work with a MySQL database from within Microsoft Excel so you can easily do tasks such as:

  • Importing MySQL data into Excel
  • Exporting Excel data directly into MySQL to a new or existing table
  • Editing MySQL data directly within Excel

MySQL for Excel is installed using the MySQL Installer for Windows which comes in 2 versions:

  • Full (150 MB) which includes a complete set of MySQL products with their binaries included in the download
  • Web (1.5 MB – a network install) which will just pull MySQL for Excel over the web and install it when run.

You can download MySQL Installer from our official Downloads page at http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/installer/.

MySQL for Excel can also be downloaded by using the product standalone installer found at this link http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/windows/excel/

 

Changes in MySQL for Excel 1.3.5 (2015-10-23)

This section documents all changes and bug fixes applied to MySQL for Excel since the release of 1.3.5. Several new features were added to the 1.3.x branch, for more information see What Is New In MySQL for Excel 1.3 (http://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql-for-excel/en/mysql-for-excel-what-is-new-1-3.html).

Functionality Added or Changed

  • A new Append Data advanced option was added, titled Confirm column mapping overwriting. When enabled, dragging and dropping source columns over target columns that were already mapped (in other words, they already contained a mapped source column) now triggers a confirmation dialog asking if the overwrite should be executed. This option is disabled by default as data overwrite is a common operation.
  • Added a new advanced option called Show column data types above column names. When checked, the Append Data dialog grid will show data type information for columns on source and target grids. This is especially helpful when manually mapping columns.
  • Added support for the JSON data type that was added in MySQL Server 5.7. The JSON data type is now selectable from the Export Data dialog, if the advanced option to show all data types is enabled. All data operations (Import, Export, Append and Edit) now function with the JSON data type.

Bugs Fixed

  • Attempting to save data to a column where the data can not be written (incompatible data type) now generates an error.
  • Changed the way data type related warnings are linked to grid columns in the Append Data dialog. Now the warnings are linked to the target (lower) grid view columns, because a single source column can be mapped to multiple target columns, and the warnings are about source data not being suitable for the target column’s data type.
  • When scrolling the target MySQL table grid horizontally, the upper column headers that contained names of the mapped source columns were not rendering text properly. The text moved while scrolling, and the column separators disappeared when scrolling to the right.
  • Change the data type detection logic for a column’s data that was failing when only the first row of data contained data, when the rest of the rows were empty.
  • The Append Data dialog was incorrectly mapping columns when only a single row of Excel data was selected to append. Also, if a single row of Excel data is selected with First Row Contains Column Names enabled, a warning is now displayed stating that no rows are available to complete the append operation.
  • Connection information created after the last save was cleared from memory when an Excel Workbook was closed, thus causing the connection information to not write to disk. Now the connection cleanup happens after a Workbook is saved, thereby saving the new connection information.
  • Stopped using hidden defined names to store formulas that transform date values into a date format used by MySQL. These defined names were being detected by Excel as macros or user functions that could not be saved in macro-free workbooks, thus generating bogus warnings every time a Workbook was saved when the Excel add-in was active.
  • Updated the data connection library to Connector/NET v6.9.8, which fixes the problem of accessing a schema that contained Unicode (non-ASCII) characters in its name. These databases now successfully open.
  • Deleted stored mappings would remain in the stored mapping method list.
  • Enhanced the custom grid view control used in the Append Data dialog to automatically adjust the width of the grid columns. This adjustment considers the grid’s cell contents, the base column header text, and also the contents of the additional header rows. Before, the target column width was too short.

 

Quick links:

Enjoy and thanks for the support!

MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2.4 has been released

MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2.4 has been released

The MySQL Windows Experience Team is proud to announce the release of MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2.4. This is a maintenance release for 1.2.x, and it can be used for production environments.

MySQL for Visual Studio is a product that includes all of the Visual Studio integration functionality to create and manage MySQL databases when developing .NET applications.

This version is appropriate for using with MySQL server versions 5.5-5.6. The 5.7 server version is also compatible but is not fully supported, thus it should be used at your own discretion.

As this is a GA version of the MySQL for Visual Studio product, it can be downloaded by using the product standalone installer at this link http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/windows/visualstudio or with the MySQL Windows Installer.

What’s new in 1.2.4

  • The MySQL for Visual studio plugin is now available in Visual Studio 2015.
  • We stopped supporting Visual Studio 2008.

Bugs Fixed

  • Added Microsoft Visual Studio 2015 support. (Bug #21438524, Bug #77708)

Known limitations

  • MySQL for Visual Studio project templates are designed to work with MVC 4, but Microsoft Visual Studio 2015 is the first VS version that ships with MVC 5. As a workaround for this release, you must install MVC 4 to get the project templates working with VS 2015. If MVC 4 is not installed, then the MySQL template menus and toolbars will be disabled.
  • If MySQL for Visual Studio 1.2.4 is installed before MVC 4, then you must uninstall and then reinstall the 1.2.4 plugin. Executing a “Change” or “Repair” will not work.
  • The Launch Workbench and Launch MySQL Utilities toolbar buttons are disabled in this release.

Quick links

Enjoy and thanks for the support!

MySQL for Visual Studio Team.