Support EOL for MySQL Connector/J 5.1

Per Oracle’s Lifetime Support policy, as of Feb 9th, 2021, MySQL Connector/J 5.1 series is covered under Oracle Sustaining Support. Downloadable binaries can be found in the MySQL Products Archives and in the Maven Central Repository.

MySQL Connector/J 5.1.49 has been the last release of Connector/J 5.1 series.

It is time to move on. Users are encouraged to upgrade to MySQL Connector/J 8.0 series which provides the same features as Connector/J 5.1 and a lot more, including a brand new date/time handling support, introduced in version 8.0.23, and the X DevAPI that empowers the MySQL Document Store.

We like to hear from you. Please join us in the MySQL Forums or in #connectors channel in:

New MySQL Entity Framework Core packages for the Connector/NET Provider at NuGet

Hello MySQL Connector/NET community,

Starting with the 8.0.23 release, our provider for Entity Framework Core has a new name. The main goal is to keep support for the different versions of Microsoft Entity Framework Core and to ensure those versions remain tighly coupled with our releases. Also, this new naming is more specific regarding the purpose of the package. Hence the Data part of the name was removed.

Before:

    MySql.Data.EntityFrameworkCore v8.0.x

Now:

    MySql.EntityFrameworkCore v8.0.x

Now that Microsoft maintains more than a single version of Entity Framework Core, we needed to find a way to name our packages and maintain the correlation between the versions of Entity Framework Core and MySQL. So that’s when we came up with using the metadata of the packages. The package version now consists of two parts, the first corresponds to the currently supported version of Microsoft Entity Framework Core and then a “plus” sign that indicates the metadata where we include the MySQL version.

    MySql.EntityFrameworkCore v5.0.0+MySQL8.0.23
    MySql.EntityFrameworkCore v3.1.10+MySQL8.0.23

Well, there is one more future scenario to consider. What if Microsoft does not release a new version for Entity Framework Core in time for our newer Connector/NET version? Let’s say that the currently supported version for Entity Framework Core is 5.0.0 so our package looks like MySql.EntityFrameworkCore 5.0.0+MySQL8.0.23, and at the time we release the next version, 8.0.24, Microsoft latest version for Entity Framework Core is still the 5.0.0. In this case, we will add a fourth digit to the version, naming the package like this: MySql.EntityFrameworkCore 5.0.0.1+MySQL8.0.23.

We hope you find this new naming model useful and more precise. Your feedback is always welcome and all your comments inspire us to keep improving so that we offer you a product with top quality.

Finally, here are some links that could be useful for you:

We hope to hear from you!

Support for Date-Time Types in Connector/J 8.0

Connector/J version 8.0.23 came out with several bug fixes related to date-time types support. They provide more flexibility for configuring time zone handling and allow migration from Connector/J 5.1 with much less effort.

Problems with migration from Connector/J 5.1 to Connector/J 8.0 were caused by the early decision that Connector/J 8.0 should always try to preserve an instant point on the time-line while Connector/J 5.1 does it optionally and, by default, preserves the original visual representation.

For example, the following code will store different results with Connector/J 5.1 and Connector/J 8.0 in case the client and server time zones are different:

Statement st = conn.createStatement();
st.executeUpdate("CREATE TABLE t1 (ts TIMESTAMP)");

PreparedStatement ps = conn.prepareStatement("INSERT INTO t1 VALUES (?)");
ps.setTimestamp(1, Timestamp.valueOf("2020-01-01 12:00:00"));
ps.executeUpdate();

If the client is running in the UTC+2 time zone and server is running in UTC+1 the internal value of the TIMESTAMP field will be “2020-01-01 11:00:00Z” with Connector/J 5.1 but “2020-01-01 10:00:00Z” with Connector/J 8.0.

Another client in the UTC+3 time zone is reading this value:

ResultSet rs = st.executeQuery("SELECT * FROM t1");
Timestamp ts = rs.getTimestamp(1);

The result will be “2020-01-01 12:00:00” with Connector/J 5.1 but “2020-01-01 13:00:00” with Connector/J 8.0.

By default, Connector/J 5.1 sends values as they are rendered locally and, on retrieval, constructs values using the client’s local time zone. Thus, the visual representation remains the same in any client time zone and on the server. But the internal UTC value of a TIMESTAMP could be different from an expected instant value.

Connector/J 8.0.22 and before converts the original value to the session time zone before sending, thus the internal UTC value of a TIMESTAMP matches the expected instant value. When retrieved, a value is constructed after converting the on-wire value from session time zone to the local one, so it still represents the same instant, but the visual representation is different in different client time zones.

Actually both approaches are valid use cases. You probably don’t care about the real internal TIMESTAMP value if you don’t do any server-side calculations with it. But you might want to store the instant point on the time-line, like for a Zoom meeting start time, in other cases. Both ways are now possible with Connector/J 8.0.23. The following connection properties define the time zone handling:

  • connectionTimeZone=LOCAL|SERVER|user-defined time zone (previously known as ‘serverTimezone’, now with additional fixed values) defines how the server’s session time zone is to be determined by Connector/J.
  • forceConnectionTimeZoneToSession=true|false controls whether the session time_zone variable is to be set to the value specified in ‘connectionTimeZone’.
  • preserveInstants=true|false turns on|off the conversion of instant values between JVM and ‘connectionTimeZone’.

The most useful configurations are:

  • connectionTimeZone=LOCAL & forceConnectionTimeZoneToSession=false – corresponds with the Connector/J 5.1 behavior with useLegacyDatetimeCode=true.
  • connectionTimeZone=LOCAL & forceConnectionTimeZoneToSession=true – the new mode which provides the most natural way for handling date-time values.
  • connectionTimeZone=SERVER & preserveInstants=true – corresponds to the previous Connector/J 8.0 behavior and Connector/J 5.1 behavior with useLegacyDatetimeCode=false.
  • connectionTimeZone=user_defined & preserveInstants=true – helps to overcome the situation when the server time zone cannot be recognized by the connector because it is set as a generic abbreviation like CET/CEST.

More details are given below, but first let’s define what exactly we mean when talking about “instant date-time classes” and “instant MySQL types”.

Supported MySQL date-time data types

The MySQL TIMESTAMP is the only data type designed to store instant points on the time-line using the implied time zone conversion. Incoming values are converted by server from the session time zone to UTC for storage, and outgoing values are converted from UTC to the session time zone. There is no way to preserve the original time zone but even if the session time zone was altered, the retrieved value still represents the same instant point on the time-line. Starting from MySQL 8.0.19, you can also specify a time zone offset when storing TIMESTAMP values (see “The DATE, DATETIME, and TIMESTAMP Types”). In such case the incoming values are converted to UTC from the specified offset instead of the session time zone. But, finally, the original offset is also lost.

The MySQL YEAR represents only the year number, DATE is missing a time part, TIME is missing the date part. So, they are definitely not instant types.

The situation with MySQL DATETIME data type is less straightforward. There is no implied time zone conversion for this type; values are stored and retrieved as they are, so this type could be taken as an analog of Java LocalDateTime. However, with the new syntax available since MySQL 8.0.19, when a value with offset is stored to a DATETIME column, it is converted to the session time zone!

New-style DATETIME values are consistent with old-style ones and the retrieved results are consistent only when client’s and session time zones are the same.

Therefore, it is more correct to say that server assumes that local date-time values coming to DATETIME always belong to the session time zone. In any case, DATETIME is not an instant type: there is no time zone information associated with a stored DATETIME value.

Users sometimes store Timestamps to DATETIME instead of TIMESTAMP because of wider ranges of represented values (‘1000-01-01 00:00:00.000000’ to ‘9999-12-31 23:59:59.999999’ against ‘1970-01-01 00:00:01.000000Z’ to ‘2038-01-19 03:14:07.999999Z’ respectively). It is possible to use DATETIME and still leverage the capability of preserving instants but with some limitations. See details in preserveInstants property description below.

Supported Java date-time classes

Connector/J 8.0.23 considers following date-time classes as “non-instant” ones even when some of them are extending the java.util.Date:

  • java.sql.Date – The time components are set to zeros.
  • java.sql.Time – The date components are set to the “zero epoch” value.
  • java.time.LocalDate – The time components and time zone are not defined.
  • java.time.LocalTime – The date components and time zone are not defined.
  • java.time.LocalDateTime – The time zone is not defined.
  • java.time.OffsetTime – The date components are not defined.

Supported “instant” date-time classes are:

  • java.util.Calendar
  • java.util.Date
  • java.sql.Timestamp
  • java.time.OffsetDateTime
  • java.time.ZonedDateTime

Preserving instants

First, let’s enumerate the time zones we are dealing with:

  • MySQL TIMESTAMP internal time zone– it’s always UTC.
  • MySQL session time zone – the per-client “on-wire” time zone, specified in the time_zone system variable. By default, the initial value of this is ‘SYSTEM’, which means, “use the value of system_time_zone”, but it may be redefined at server startup with the –default-time-zone option.
  • Client local time zone – the JVM default time zone. By default, it is equal to the client system time zone but can be changed by an application.
  • Original time zone – Objects based on java.util.Date are associated with the JVM time zone by default, but java.util.Calendar, java.time.OffsetDateTime and java.time.ZonedDateTime have an explicit time zone.

So, MySQL never stores a date-time value with its original time zone but it always assumes that this value is correctly represented in the session time zone. It means that in order to preserve the instant value, Connector/J should adjust it to the session time zone before sending to server. It can be done in different ways. Either Connector/J converts the value from the original time zone to the session time zone and then sends it, or Connector/J could set the session time zone equal to the local one so that no conversion is needed then except for java.util.Calendar, java.time.OffsetDateTime, and java.time.ZonedDateTime values, which should be converted to the local time zone.

Connector/J will never try to preserve the instant value if either the source class or the target type are not of the instant-based ones, even if Connector/J is configured to preserve instant. For example, if java.sql.Date is sent as SQL TIMESTAMP, it is rendered in the local time zone, if java.sql.Timestamp is sent as SQL DATE it is also rendered in the local time zone. But when java.sql.Timestamp is sent as SQL TIMESTAMP the value will be adjusted to the session time zone.

For example, with client time zone UTC+2, session time zone UTC+1 and connection is created with connectionTimeZone=SERVER&preserveInstants=true:

import com.mysql.cj.MysqlType;
...
ps = conn.prepareStatement("INSERT INTO t1 VALUES (?)");

ps.setObject(Date.valueOf("2020-01-01"), MysqlType.DATE);
ps.executeUpdate(); // sends "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES ('2020-01-01')"

ps.setObject(Date.valueOf("2020-01-01"), MysqlType.TIMESTAMP);
ps.executeUpdate(); // sends "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES ('2020-01-01 00:00:00')"

ps.setObject(Timestamp.valueOf("2020-01-01 00:00:00"), MysqlType.TIMESTAMP);
ps.executeUpdate(); // sends "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES ('2019-12-31 23:00:00')"

Please note, that the target type is not necessarily the real target column type. Connector/J has two implementations of PreparedStatement. ServerPreparedStatement is really prepared on the server side and returns the parameters’ metadata on prepare. But the ClientPreparedStatement is prepared on the client side and sent as a plain query on execute, thus no parameters metadata is available there. Since Connector/J could switch between these implementations internally on some conditions, they should perform identically. Thus, for the sake of consistency, the parameters metadata is not used, the decision about sent value is always based only on the default JDBC Type for the used Java class, as defined in TABLE B-4 of the JDBC specification, or on the explicitly defined target JDBC Type in a setObject() call.

MySQL DATETIME is a non-standard type but it matches perfectly with the LocalDateTime class by nature, thus the default target type for LocalDateTime is MysqlType.DATETIME instead of TIMESTAMP, as per the JDBC specification.

Time zone configuration properties

  • connectionTimeZone=LOCAL|SERVER|user-defined time zone. The ‘serverTimezone’ property was renamed to ‘connectionTimeZone’ in order to highlight that it does not necessary match the real server or session time zone. It just informs the connector which time zone should be used in cases where the instant value must be converted between the JVM and the on-wire time zones. If it is set to “LOCAL” (which is the default value, if the property is not specified) the driver assumes that the connection time zone is the same as the JVM default time zone. If set to “SERVER” then the driver attempts to detect the session time zone from the values configured on the MySQL server session variables “time_zone” or “system_time_zone”. An explicit value must be a geographic time zone name or a time zone offset from Greenwich/UTC, using a syntax java.time.ZoneId is able to parse.

This option itself does not set MySQL server session variable ‘time_zone’ to the given value. To do that the ‘forceConnectionTimeZoneToSession’ connection option must be set to “true”.

Please note that setting a value to ‘connectionTimeZone’ in conjunction with ‘forceConnectionTimeZoneToSession=false’ and ‘preserveInstants=false’ has no effects since, in that case, connectionTimeZone is used neither to change the session time zone nor to convert the time zone.

  • forceConnectionTimeZoneToSession=true|false. If it is set to “false” (which is the default value) the session time zone is left unchanged on the server. When this property is set to “true”, the driver sets the time zone value determined by ‘connectionTimeZone’ connection property to the current server session ‘time_zone’ variable.

Please be aware that altering the session time zone also affects the result of MySQL functions such as ‘NOW()’, ‘CURTIME()’ or ‘CURDATE()’.

This option has no effect if used in conjunction with ‘connectionTimeZone=SERVER’ since, in this case, you are requesting the session time zone to be set to the value it already has.

  • preserveInstants=true|false. With ‘preserveInstants=false’ Connector/J 8.0.23 always uses the JVM default time zone for rendering the values it sends to the server and for constructing the Java objects from the fetched data. It matches the default Connector/J 5.1 behavior. If ‘preserveInstants=true’ (which is the default value), Connector/J does its best to preserve the instant point on the time-line for Java instant-based objects such as java.sql.Timestamp or java.time.OffsetDateTime, instead of preserving the time’s original visual form. When storing, the conversion is performed only if the target SQLType, either the explicit one or the default one, is TIMESTAMP. When retrieving, the conversion is performed only if the source column has the TIMESTAMP, DATETIME or character type and the target class is an instant-based one, like java.sql.Timestamp or java.time.OffsetDateTime.

This option has no effect if used in conjunction with ‘connectionTimeZone=LOCAL’ since, in this case, the source and target time zones are the same.

Conversion between original time zone and session time zone has a risk of altering the value in case they have incompatible DST rules.

Time zone configurations

  • connectionTimeZone=LOCAL & forceConnectionTimeZoneToSession=false. No time zone conversion is done by the driver because it assumes that the session time zone equals to the local one. The actual session time zone is left untouched and it is the same for all clients. That’s the way for keeping the same visual date-time value representation. Instants may be kept correctly only when all clients and the server are actually residing in the same time zone.

This configuration corresponds to the default Connector/J 5.1 behavior (with useLegacyDatetimeCode=true).

  • connectionTimeZone=LOCAL & forceConnectionTimeZoneToSession=true. This new mode provides the most natural way for handling date-time values. Connector/J sets the session time zone equal to the local one and always uses the local time zone internally. Server converts a TIMESTAMP to its internal UTC value directly from the client time zone eliminating possible problems with DST. It’s also safe to use both the old syntax and the extended syntax with zone offset for setting DATETIMEs–they are finally adjusted to the same session time zone.

Since different clients in this mode might change their individual session into different time zones, this mode does not allow the same visual date-time value representation to be kept in a TIMESTAMP column; store the value to a DATETIME column instead.

And, again, altering the session time zone also affects the result of MySQL functions such as ‘NOW()’, ‘CURTIME()’ or ‘CURDATE()’.

  • connectionTimeZone=SERVER & preserveInstants=true. The session time zone is left untouched and it is the same for all clients. The driver converts instant values to the session time zone when they are sent as a TIMESTAMP. When retrieving, the driver converts values from the session time zone to the local one if the source column is in the TIMESTAMP, DATETIME or character type and the target class is an instant-based one.

This configuration corresponds to the previous Connector/J 8.0 behavior and Connector/J 5.1 behavior with useLegacyDatetimeCode=false.

  • connectionTimeZone=user_defined & preserveInstants=true. Without changing the session time zone on the server, this setup helps to overcome the situation in which the server time zone cannot be recognized by the connector because it is set with an unrecognizable, generic abbreviation like CET or CEST. This configuration gives Connector/J the proper time zone identification for the session, to which the timestamps should be converted.

OffsetDateTime and ZonedDateTime support

The original time zone of java.time.OffsetDateTime and java.time.ZonedDateTime is never preserved when they are stored to the date-time column. The driver first converts the date-time values into the local time zone and then, if it is preserving instants, it converts them to the session time zone.

When the driver reads instants from the server into these objects and it is configured to preserve instants, the result will be constructed with the session time zone. Otherwise, result will be constructed with the local time zone.

For example, with client time zone UTC+2, session time zone UTC+1 and the connection created with connectionTimeZone=SERVER&preserveInstants=true:

import com.mysql.cj.MysqlType;
...
ps = conn.prepareStatement("INSERT INTO t1 VALUES (?)");

ps.setObject(OffsetDateTime.parse("2020-01-01T13:00:00+03:00"));
ps.executeUpdate();
// sends "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES ('2020-01-01 11:00:00')"

ResultSet rs = st.executeQuery("SELECT * FROM t1");
String odt = rs.getObject(1, OffsetDateTime.class).toString();
// returns "2020-01-01T11:00:00+01:00"

Fractional seconds support

New connection property sendFractionalSecondsForTime=true|false tells the driver to send or ignore the fractional seconds contained in java.sql.Time.

This option overrides the inconsistency between MySQL TIME and JDBC java.sql.Time. While MySQL TIME may store fractional seconds the java.sql.Time is defined as a time value without a fractional part. On the other hand, java.sql.Time is a wrapper around the java.util.Date, thus internally it also may contain fractional seconds. So, when sending the java.sql.Time with ‘sendFractionalSecondsForTime=true’, its value is rendered with fractional seconds; with ‘sendFractionalSecondsForTime=false’, the value is rendered without fractional seconds.

This option is not applied to getters–values from MySQL TIME are always constructed with a fractional part if provided by server.

Connection property sendFractionalSeconds=true|false is redefined as a global switch. If set to “false”, fractional seconds are rounded or truncated not only for TIMESTAMP but also for any other date-time type.

Additional Information and Resources

Deprecating End-of-life runtime engines on Connector/Node.js

Starting with the 8.0.23 release, Connector/Node.js will be deprecating support for End-of-life Node.js engine versions. Support for these versions will eventually be removed on subsequent releases which will focus on compatibility with the available LTS versions at the date of each release.

Continue reading

MySQL Connector/ODBC 8.0.23 has been released

Dear MySQL users,

MySQL Connector/ODBC 8.0.23 is a new version in the MySQL Connector/ODBC
8.0 series, the ODBC driver for the MySQL Server.

The available downloads include both a Unicode driver and an ANSI driver
based on the same modern codebase. Please select the driver type you
need based on the type of your application – Unicode or ANSI.
Server-side prepared statements are enabled by default. It is suitable
for use with the latest MySQL server version 8.0.

This release of the MySQL ODBC driver is conforming to the ODBC 3.8
specification. It contains implementations of key 3.8 features,
including self-identification as a ODBC 3.8 driver, streaming of out (for
binary types only), and support of the SQL_ATTR_RESET_CONNECTION
connection attribute (for the Unicode driver only).

The release is now available in source and binary form for a number of
platforms from our download pages at

https://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/odbc/

For information on installing, please see the documentation at

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-odbc/en/connector-odbc-installation.html

Enjoy and thanks for your support!

Changes in MySQL Connector/ODBC 8.0.23 (2021-01-18, General Availability)

Bugs Fixed

* Using the commercial glib package
(authentication_ldap_sasl) with auth using GSSAPI
(authentication_ldap_sasl_auth_method_name=’GSSAPI’) did
not function. Added the missing sasl2 modules package.
(Bug #32175842)

* On Debian based systems, the post-installation script
uses dpkg-architecture ODBC drivers path, so the
associated dpkg-dev package was added as a runtime
dependency. (Bug #32157740)

* Microsoft Access halted when opening a linked table with
only a JSON column. The JSON column type is now
supported, and JSON data is only editable if another
column is used as a primary key. Because JSON is a long
data type with the maximum length of 4GB, it can’t be
used as a primary key by Microsoft Access and therefore
tables having only JSON columns are only available in
read-only mode. (Bug #32114901)

* Removed the mysql-client-plugins dependency. It remains
required for connections using commercial MySQL server
accounts with LDAP authentication, so must be manually
installed for that situation. The mysql-client-plugins
package has conflicts with MySQL server versions before
8.0.21, so earlier versions (such as MySQL 5.7) require
an 8.0 server upgrade to use it. (Bug #31875490)

* On macOS, Connector/ODBC would not report an error if
SQL_ATTR_PARAMSET_SIZE was set but not supported; instead
the setting was ignored. (Bug #29862441, Bug #95608)

On Behalf of Oracle/MySQL Release Engineering Team,
Hery Ramilison

MySQL Connector/Python 8.0.23 has been released

Dear MySQL users,

MySQL Connector/Python 8.0.23 is the latest GA release version of the MySQL Connector Python 8.0 series. The X DevAPI enables application developers to write code that combines the strengths of the relational and document models using a modern, NoSQL-like syntax that does not assume previous experience writing traditional SQL.

To learn more about how to write applications using the X DevAPI, see

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/x-devapi-userguide/en/

For more information about how the X DevAPI is implemented in MySQL Connector/Python, and its usage, see

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/dev/connector-python

Please note that the X DevAPI requires at least MySQL Server version 8.0 or higher with the X Plugin enabled. For general documentation about how

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/document-store.html

To download MySQL Connector/Python 8.0.23, see the “General Availability (GA) Releases” tab at

http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/python/

Enjoy!

Changes in MySQL Connector/Python 8.0.23 (2021-01-18, General Availability)

Functionality Added or Changed

  • Deprecated Python 2.7 support; a warning was added to describe Python 2.7 support being removed in Connector/Python 8.0.24.

    Previously, Connector/Python added client support for the MySQL Enterprise Edition SASL LDAP authentication plugin with SCRAM-SHA-1 as an authentication method. Connector/Python now also supports SCRAM-SHA-256 as an alternative authentication method for classic MySQL protocol connections. SASL-based LDAP authentication does not apply to clients running macOS.

  • Added SASL authentication protocol support using the GSSAPI (Kerberos) authentication method for the pure python implementation (this is not available for the c-ext version of Connector/Python).

    This functionality requires the GSSAPI pypi module, which provides both low-level and high-level wrappers around the GSSAPI C libraries. The GSSAPI pypi module requires MIT kerberos installed opn the system to function and request tickets to authenticate Connector/Python with the MySQL server when the user is IDENTIFIED WITH authentication_ldap_sasl and the authentication_ldap_sasl plugin is configured to use the GSSAPI mechanism.

    This also adds a new krb_service_principal option, which must be a string in the form “primary/instance@realm” such as “ldap/ldapauth@MYSQL.COM” where “@realm” is optional. The “@realm” defaults to the default realm, as configured in the krb5.conf file.

Bugs Fixed

  • Fixed the AttributeError raised when getting the connection ID from a closed CMySQLConnection. (Bug #31882419, Bug #100825)

  • Fixed support for named tuple (an invalid exception was generated) and dictionary cursors (incorrect type of result was returned). (Bug #29195610)

  • Fixed cursor.fetchone() and cursor.fetchmany() to comply with PEP 249, which specifies that an exception must be raised if the previous call to cursor.execute*() does not produce any result set or no call was issued yet. (Bug #26834307, Bug #87815)

  • Fixed the microsecond conversion from MySQL datetime to Python datetime when using fractional values with the C extension enabled. For example, 2016-10-20 15:40:23.8 from MySQL resulted in datetime.datetime(2016, 10, 20, 15, 40, 23, 8) instead of datetime.datetime(2016, 10, 20, 15, 40, 23, 800000). Thanks to Vilnis Termanis for the patch. (Bug #24938411, Bug #83479)

MySQL Connector/Node.js 8.0.23 has been released


Dear MySQL users,

MySQL Connector/Node.js is a new Node.js driver for use with the X
DevAPI. This release, v8.0.23, is a maintenance release of the
MySQL Connector/Node.js 8.0 series.

The X DevAPI enables application developers to write code that combines
the strengths of the relational and document models using a modern,
NoSQL-like syntax that does not assume previous experience writing
traditional SQL.

MySQL Connector/Node.js can be downloaded through npm (see
  https://www.npmjs.com/package/@mysql/xdevapi for details) or from
  https://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/nodejs/.

To learn more about how to write applications using the X DevAPI, see
  http://dev.mysql.com/doc/x-devapi-userguide/en/.
For more information about how the X DevAPI is implemented in MySQL
Connector/Node.js, and its usage, see
  http://dev.mysql.com/doc/dev/connector-nodejs/.

Please note that the X DevAPI requires at least MySQL Server version
8.0 or higher with the X Plugin enabled. For general documentation
about how to get started using MySQL as a document store, see
  http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/document-store.html.

Changes in MySQL Connector/Node.js 8.0.23 (2021-01-18, General Availability)

* Functionality Added or Changed
* Bugs Fixed

Functionality Added or Changed

* Added custom debug functionality using the NODE_DEBUG
environment variable to log and inspect low-level details
for the application. Connector/Node.js now supports this
feature and uses it, in particular, for logging
information about the protocol messages (inbound and
outbound) that are exchanged with the MySQL server.
Messages sent by the client are available under the
protocol:outbound scope, whereas messages sent by the
server are available under the protocol:inbound scope.
For example, the following writes a textual protobuf
representation of every Mysqlx.Crud.Find and
Mysqlx.Resultset.Row message to stderr: shell> NODE_DEBUG=’protocol:outbound:Mysqlx.Crud.Find,protocol:inbound :Mysqlx.Resultset.Row’ node app.js

Node 10 and later supports wildcard pattern matching,
such as NODE_DEBUG=’protocol:inbound:*’ to filter out
inbound messages and NODE_DEBUG=’*’ to show all logs.
(Bug #31729043)

* Added a deprecation warning to the Connector/Node.js
installation process that future Connector/Node.js
versions do not guarantee compatibility with End-of-life
Node.js versions. If you are planning to upgrade, make
sure you are using Node.js 12.0.0 or higher.

Bugs Fixed

* Stored values in a DOUBLE column were truncated when
encoded and sent to the MySQL server. For example, a
value such as 1.000001 would become 1. They are now
encoded properly as double-precision floating numbers to
support the full range of 64-bit floating point precision
in MySQL columns with the DOUBLE data type (having in
mind possible rounding an approximations performed by the
database engine). (Bug #31734504)

* Improved consistency for method argument error handling
when an argument is not set or uses JavaScript’s
“undefined”. (Bug #31709879)

* Refactored code to disable all debugging utilities when
debug mode is off. (Bug #31584269)

On Behalf of MySQL Release Engineering Team,
Surabhi Bhat

MySQL Connector/NET 8.0.23 has been released

Dear MySQL users,

MySQL Connector/NET 8.0.23 is the latest General Availability release
of the MySQL Connector/NET 8.0 series. This version supports .NET 5.0
and the X DevAPI, which enables application developers to write code
that combines the strengths of the relational and document models
using a modern, NoSQL-like syntax that does not assume previous
experience writing traditional SQL.

To learn more about how to write applications using the X DevAPI, see

  http://dev.mysql.com/doc/x-devapi-userguide/en/

For more information about how the X DevAPI is implemented in
Connector/NET, see

  http://dev.mysql.com/doc/dev/connector-net

NuGet packages provide functionality at a project level. To get the
full set of features available in Connector/NET such as availability
in the GAC, integration with Visual Studio’s Entity Framework Designer
and integration with MySQL for Visual Studio, installation through the
MySQL Installer or the stand-alone MSI is required.

Please note that the X DevAPI requires at least MySQL Server version
8.0 or higher with the X Plugin enabled. For general documentation
about how to get started using MySQL as a document store, see

  http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/document-store.html

To download MySQL Connector/NET 8.0.23, see

  http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/net/

Installation instructions can be found at

  https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-net/en/connector-net-installation.html

Enjoy!

Changes in MySQL Connector/NET 8.0.23 (2021-01-18, General
Availability)


Functionality Added or Changed

     * Connector/NET updates to SSH ciphers and algorithms are:

          + Encryptions: aes192-cbc, aes256-cbc (deprecated);
            3des-cbc, blowfish-cbc, twofish-cbc, twofish128-cbc,
            twofish192-cbc, twofish256-cbc (invalid)

          + Host Key Algorithms: ssh-rsa (deprecated); sh-dss
            (invalid)

          + Key Exchange Algorithms:
            diffie-hellman-group-exchange-sha1 (invalid)

          + Keyed Hash Message Authentication Codes:
            hmac-ripemd160,hmac-ripemd160@openssh.com,
            hmac-sha1-96 (invalid)

       For a complete list, see SSH Ciphers in Connector/NET
       https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-net/en/connector-net-ssh-ciphers.html
       (Bug #31917057)

     * The IgnorePrepare connection-string option is deprecated
       in this release and the default value, which was true, is
       now false. When set to true, the option instructs
       Connector/NET to ignore any calls to
       MySqlCommand.Prepare() made with the classic MySQL
       protocol. The option is scheduled for removal in the next
       release. (Bug #31872906)

     * ASP.NET applications using the MySQL provider model
       (MySql.Web) can now target .NET Framework 4.8.
       (Bug #31799902)

     * The following synonyms for the Server connection string
       option were deprecated in Connector/NET 8.0.22 and
       removed in 8.0.23: address, addr, and network address.
       (Bug #31248601)

     * Previously, Connector/NET added client support for the
       MySQL Enterprise Edition SASL LDAP authentication plugin
       with SCRAM-SHA-1 as an authentication method.
       Connector/NET now also supports SCRAM-SHA-256 as an
       alternative authentication method for classic MySQL
       protocol connections. SCRAM-SHA-256 is similar to
       SCRAM-SHA-1 but is more secure. SASL-based LDAP
       authentication does not apply to clients running macOS.

     * With the availability of Entity Framework Core 5.0 in
       addition to Entity Framework Core 3.1, Connector/NET now
       provides two distinct EF Core packages. The split enables
       the connector to support both feature sets as they
       diverge. Initially, Connector/NET supports a partial EF
       Core 5.0 feature set (equivalent to EF Core 3.1) in this
       release. For more information, see Entity Framework Core
       Support
       https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-net/en/connector-net-entityframework-core.html
       Breaking change: all MySql.Data.EntityFrameworkCore.xxx
       namespaces are renamed to MySql.EntityFrameworkCore.xxx.
       New EF Core package naming for Connector/NET 8.0.23:

          + 5.0.0-m8.0.23
          + 3.1.10-m8.0.23

Bugs Fixed

     * If a prepared statement had no parameters, Connector/NET
       included in the COM_STMT_EXECUTE packet structure a byte
       corresponding to new-params-bound-flag instead of sending
       the byte only when the number of parameters was greater
       than zero. (Bug #32208427)

     * Incomplete validation limited the expected range of
       values that a stored procedure with a parameter of type
       Boolean could assign using the MySqlParameter.MySqlDbType
       property. (Bug #32066024, Bug #101302)

     * Stronger validation was applied to information contained
       in the certificate store for connections made using
       SslMode. (Bug #31954655)

     * A connection timeout was added to prevent the
       MySqlConnection.Open method from waiting indefinitely for
       a response after MySQL Router restarted unexpectedly.
       (Bug #31945397, Bug #100692)

     * A cast made with the wrong data type during a valid EF
       Core operation returned an exception.
       (Bug #31860492, Bug #100773)

     * Connector/NET used the value of -1 internally to ensure
       that a parameter without an index was added to the end of
       the parameter list. However, if an index with an actual
       value of -1 was passed in, the collection was interpreted
       as having no index and the argument did not generate an
       out-of-range exception. (Bug #31754599, Bug #100522)

     * Without validation, an underlying 64-bit enumeration
       value passed in as a MySQL command parameter defaulted to
       type Int32 and produced an overflow exception.
       (Bug #25467610, Bug #84701)

Enjoy and thanks for the support!

On behalf of the MySQL Release Team,
Nawaz Nazeer Ahamed

MySQL Connector/C++ 8.0.23 has been released

Dear MySQL users,

MySQL Connector/C++ 8.0.23 is a new release version of the MySQL
Connector/C++ 8.0 series.

Connector/C++ 8.0 can be used to access MySQL implementing Document
Store or in a traditional way, using SQL queries. It allows writing
both C++ and plain C applications using X DevAPI and X DevAPI for C.
It also supports the legacy API of Connector/C++ 1.1 based on JDBC4.

To learn more about how to write applications using X DevAPI, see
“X DevAPI User Guide” at

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/x-devapi-userguide/en/

See also “X DevAPI Reference” at

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/dev/connector-cpp/devapi_ref.html

and “X DevAPI for C Reference” at

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/dev/connector-cpp/xapi_ref.html

For generic information on using Connector/C++ 8.0, see

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/dev/connector-cpp/

For general documentation about how to get started using MySQL
as a document store, see

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/document-store.html

To download MySQL Connector/C++ 8.0.23, see the “General Availability (GA)
Releases” tab at

https://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/cpp/

Changes in MySQL Connector/C++ 8.0.23 (2021-01-18, General Availability)

     * Legacy (JDBC API) Notes

     * Functionality Added or Changed

     * Bugs Fixed

Legacy (JDBC API) Notes

    * Previously, to build or run applications that use the
       legacy JDBC API, it was necessary to have Boost
       installed. Boost is no longer required for such
       applications. The API has not changed, so no code changes
       are required to build applications. However, in
       consequence of this change, the ABI version has increased
       from 7 to 9. To run applications, a version of
       Connector/C++ built with the same ABI must be installed:

          + Applications built using the new ABI require a
            version of Connector/C++ also built using the new
            ABI.

          + Applications built using the old ABI require a
            version of Connector/C++ also built using the old
            ABI.
       To build the legacy connector itself from source, it is
       still necessary to have Boost installed.

Functionality Added or Changed


     * All calls that allow a column name, such as findColumn(),
       getString(), and getInt(), are now case-sensitive. (Bug
       #30126457, Bug #96398)

     * The developer documentation was improved regarding how to
       decode the bytes received by mysqlx_get_bytes(). Thanks
       to Daniël van Eeden for pointing at the missing
       documentation. (Bug #29115299, Bug #93641)

     * Thanks to Daniël van Eeden, who contributed various
       corrections to the developer documentation. (Bug
       #29038157, Bug #93549)

     * A dependency on the mysql-client-plugins package was
       removed. This package now is required only on hosts where
       Connector/C++ applications make connections using
       commercial MySQL server accounts with LDAP
       authentication. In that case, additional libraries must
       also be installed: cyrus-sasl-scram for installations
       that use RPM packages and libsasl2-modules-gssapi-mit for
       installations that use Debian packages. These SASL
       packages provide the support required to use the
       SCRAM-SHA-256 and GSSAPI/Kerberos authentication methods
       for LDAP.
       If Connector/C++ applications do not use LDAP
       authentication, no additional packages are required.

Bugs Fixed


     * Connector/C++ 8.0 RPM packages could not be installed on
       a system where MySQL 5.7 RPM packages were installed.
       (Bug #32142148)

     * Establishing a connection using a ConnectOptionsMap
       object could fail due to differences in std::string
       implementations. (Bug #32039929)

     * Commercial Connector/C++ RPM packages were missing
       provides information. (Bug #31775733)

On Behalf of MySQL Release Engineering Team,
Tvarita Jain

MySQL Connector/J 8.0.23 has been released

Dear MySQL users,

MySQL Connector/J 8.0.23 is the latest General Availability release of
the MySQL Connector/J 8.0 series. It is suitable for use with MySQL
Server versions 8.0, 5.7, and 5.6. It supports the Java Database
Connectivity (JDBC) 4.2 API, and implements the X DevAPI.

This release includes the following new features and changes, also
described in more detail on

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/relnotes/connector-j/8.0/en/news-8-0-23.html

As always, we recommend that you check the “CHANGES” file in the
download archive to be aware of changes in behavior that might affect
your application.

To download MySQL Connector/J 8.0.23 GA, see the “General Availability
(GA) Releases” tab at http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/j/

Enjoy!

Changes in MySQL Connector/J 8.0.23 (2021-01-18, General Availability)

Deprecation and Removal Notes

* As an implementation of the MySQL Terminology Updates (https://mysqlhighavailability.com/mysql-terminology-updates/),
connection properties and public method names have
been adjusted in the following manners:

  • Changing “master” to “source”: For example, the
    connection property queriesBeforeRetryMaster becomes
    queriesBeforeRetrySource, and the method
    isMasterConnection() becomes isSourceConnection()

  • Changing “slave” to “replica”: For example, the
    connection property allowSlavesDownConnections
    becomes allowReplicaDownConnections, and the method
    getSlaveHosts() becomes getReplicaHosts()

  • Changing “blacklist” to “blocklist”: For example,
    the connection property loadBalanceBlacklistTimeout
    becomes loadBalanceBlocklistTimeout.

Old names have been deprecated—though they are still
usable for now, they are to be removed eventually in
future releases; users are therefore encouraged to switch
to the new names.

See the MySQL Connector/J 8.0 Developer Guide
(https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-j/8.0/en/), the
Connector/J API documentation (generated by Javadoc), and
the MySQL Connector/J X DevAPI Reference for information
on any new property and method names.

Functionality Added or Changed

* While a java.sql.TIME instance, according to the JDBC
specification, is not supposed to contain fractional
seconds by design, because java.sql.TIME is a wrapper
around java.util.Date, it is possible to store fractional
seconds in a java.sql.TIME instance. However, when
Connector/J inserted a java.sql.TIME into the server as a
MySQL TIME value, the fractional seconds were always
truncated. To allow the fractional seconds to be sent to
the server, a new connection property,
sendFractionalSecondsForTime, has been introduced: when
the property is true (which is the default value), the
fractional seconds for java.sql.TIME are sent to the
server; otherwise, the fractional seconds are truncated.
Also, the connection property sendFractionalSeconds has
been changed into a global control for the sending of
fractional seconds for ALL date-time types. As a result,
if sendFractionalSeconds=false, fractional seconds are
not sent irrespective of the value of
sendFractionalSecondsForTime.
(Bug #20959249, Bug #76775)

* Connector/J now supports the following authentication
methods for LDAP Pluggable Authentication
(https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/ldap-pluggable-authentication.html)
with the MySQL Enterprise Server:

  • The GSSAPI/Kerberos Authentication Method:
    (https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/ldap-pluggable-authentication.html#ldap-pluggable-authentication-gssapi)
    A new connection property,
    ldapServerHostname, has been introduced for
    specifying the LDAP service host principal as
    configured in the Kerberos key distribution centre
    (KDC). See the description for ldapServerHostname in
    the MySQL Connector/J 8.0 Developer Guide
    (https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-j/8.0/en/) for details.

  • The SCRAM-SHA-256 method.

Bugs Fixed

* Storing a java.time.LocalDateTime object onto the server
as a TIMESTAMP value using a batched PreparedStatement
failed with the complaint that java.time.LocalDateTime
could not be cast to java.sql.Timestamp. With this fix,
the casting works again.
(Bug #32099505, Bug #101413)

* Using the setObject() method to set a
ByteArrayInputStream instance for a PreparedStatement
resulted in a SQLException. (Bug #32046007, Bug #101242)

* The returned value for a TIMESTAMP was incorrect when a
temporal interval expression
(https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/expressions.html#temporal-intervals)
was used in the SQL statement for
the query. (Bug #31074051, Bug #99013)

* After upgrading from Connector/J 5.1 to 8.0, the results
of saving and then retrieving DATETIME and TIMESTAMP
values became different sometimes. It was because while
Connector/J 5.1 does not preserve a time instant by
default, Connector/J 8.0.22 and earlier tried to so by
converting a timestamp to the server’s session time zone
before sending its value to the server. In this release,
new mechanisms for controlling timezone conversion has
been introduced—see Preserving Time Instants
(https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-j/8.0/en/connector-j-time-instants.html)
for details. Under this new
mechanism, the default behavior of Connector/J 5.1 in
this respect is preserved by setting the connection
property preserveInstants=false. (Bug #30962953, Bug
#98695, Bug #30573281, Bug #95644)

* Conversion of a MySQL DATETIME or TIMESTAMP value to a
Java OffsetDateTime using the getObject(i,
OffsetDateTime.class) method failed with a “Conversion
not supported for type …” error. It was because the
OffsetDateTime.parse() method on DATETIME and TIMESTAMP
values yielded an unexpected string format. With this
patch, conversions between OffsetDateTime and the DATE,
TIME, DATETIME, TIMESTAMP, and YEAR data types are now
possible, and an instant point on the timeline is
preserved as such during a conversion, when
possible—see Preserving Time Instants
(https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-j/8.0/en/connector-j-time-instants.html)
for details. (Bug #29402209, Bug #94457)

* When the server’s session time zone setting was not
understandable by Connector/J (for example, it was set to
CEST), a connection could not be established with the
server unless Connector/J specified the correct IANA time
zone name in the serverTimezone connection property. This
happened even if there was actually no need to use any
date-time functionality in Connector/J. The issue was
fixed by the new connection properties for Connector/J
that control date-time handling—see Preserving Time Instants
(https://dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-j/8.0/en/connector-j-time-instants.html)
for details. The following now
happens with respect to the above-mentioned situation:

  • If the new connection property connectionTimeZone is
    set to LOCAL or a specified time zone, the time_zone
    variable on the server is no longer checked

  • If connectionTimeZone=SERVER, the check for the
    time_zone variable is delayed until date-time driver
    functionality is first invoked, so that an
    unrecognizable server time zone does not prevent
    connection to be established. However, when
    date-time functionality is invoked and the value of
    time_zone cannot be recognized by Connector/J, an
    exception is thrown.

(Bug #21789378)

Enjoy and thanks for the support!

On behalf of the MySQL Release Team,
Balasubramanian Kandasamy